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One Billion Rising

A Global Campaign to Stop Violence Against Women and Girls

Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence (NNADV) is encouraging individuals, schools, organizations, and businesses in Nevada to join with activists around the world for One Billion Rising, the largest day of action in the history of V-Day, the global activist movement to end violence against women and girls.

One Billion Rising began as a call to action based on the staggering statistic that 1 in 3 women on the planet will be beaten or raped during her lifetime. With the world population at 7 billion, this adds up to more than one billion women and girls violated – one billion daughters, mothers, grandmothers, sisters, lovers, and friends. Yet, most of the world remains silent and indifferent. The time has come to put a stop to the violence, and to the silence that surrounds it.

On February 14, 2013, V-Day’s 15th anniversary, your school, organization, or business can join activists, writers, thinkers, celebrities, and women and men across the world as they express their outrage, demand change, strike, dance and rise in defiance of the injustices women suffer, demanding at last an end to violence against women. V-Day wants the world to see the collective strength, the numbers, and the solidarity across borders to say NO to violence against women and girls.

Already thousands of activists and organization around the globe have signed on and events are being planned in 182 countries. Women’s, human rights, labor, economic justice, environmental, faith-based, and LGBTQ groups, as well as artists and high profile lawmakers are coming together. Some organizations have adopted the movement’s dance anthem, BREAK THE CHAIN! and are organizing flash mobs in high profile locations across the world.

“This revolutionary event provides an excellent opportunity to draw attention upon the epidemic of gender-based violence,” says Sue Meuschke, NNADV’s executive director, by creating your own community-wide event or join other events being organized across the country to emphasize the injustice facing survivors of abuse.”

To express your concern, build awareness, and demand change, sign-up at www.onebillionrising.org. For a listing of events in Nevada, you can search by state, organization sponsor, date scheduled, or zip code.

What can one person do to make a difference and increase awareness about ending violence? Invite your friends to participate in a “day of action” event that demands an end to violence by:

  • Connecting with others about the campaign through social media – blog, create a link to the campaign on your Facebook page;
  • Challenging your businesses partners to raise funds to support domestic violence programs in your community;
  • Modeling new non-violent ways to stop bullying or harassment in your school or office;
  • Volunteering at a local domestic violence shelter;
  • Submitting articles to local media;
  • Contacting your local legislator to increase funding for women’s service programs; and
  • Creating signs, posters or design a T-shirt and wear it to your event. Visit www.onebillionrising.org for more ideas.

In 2012, over 5,800 V-Day events took place produced by volunteer activists in the U.S. and around the world, educating millions of people about the reality of violence against women and girls. To learn more about the V-Day organization, visit www.vday.org.


NNADV Supports Gun Control Policies

NNADV Supports Common Sense Gun Policies to Help Reduce Domestic Violence Homicides

The Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence (NNADV) endorses many of the recommendations outlined by President Obama and Vice President Biden in response to the devastating impact of gun violence. This initiative represents a significant step in making our country a safer place by supporting targeted, effective policies that respond to gun violence.

Nationally, more than three women a day, on average, are killed by an intimate partner, and guns play a large role in the level of lethality. Access to firearms dramatically increases the risk of intimate partner homicide, compared to instances where there are no weapons, and that abusers who possess guns tend to inflict the most severe abuse on their partners. According to a study released by the Violence Policy Center (VPC) on September 19, 2012, Nevada ranked first in the nation in the rate of women killed by men for the third year in a row with a rate of 2.62 per 100,000. This rate was more than double the national average. Nevada has held the top position for five of the last six years.

Snapshot of Nevada, according to the annual VPC report, When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2010 Homicide Data:

  • In 2010, 35 women were murdered by males in Nevada.
  • For homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 45 percent of female victims were shot and killed with guns. Of these, 73 percent were killed with handguns.
  • For homicides in which the victim to offender relationship could be identified, 91 percent of female victims were murdered by someone they knew, 56 percent were wives, common-law wives, ex-wives, or girlfriends of the offenders.

“The protections and restrictions on guns announced this week will reduce the risks for victims of domestic violence,” states Sue Meuschke, executive director of the Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence. “The President’s Plan addresses key safety concerns. Of particular concern is universal screening. Currently individuals convicted of domestic violence or who have an active Extended Order for Protection against domestic violence are prohibited from possessing firearms – in fact one study shows this restriction to be the second most common reason for denial of handgun purchase applications. Yet many of those individuals have been able to access guns through private sale, on the Internet, or at gun shows, where background checks are not required, and concern also extends to the implementation of these laws. There are limited resources currently available on the local, state and national levels that have hampered the impact of legislation. More must be done to insure effective implementation.”

“Reducing domestic violence homicide is the responsibility of all Nevada’s communities. As the VPC report points out, women in Nevada are at a higher risk of being victims of homicide perpetrated by people they know and love. Common sense gun laws are a step in the right direction to change this outcome,” concludes Meuschke.

STATISTICS ON GUNS, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND HOMICIDE

Compiled by National Network to End Domestic Violence

Nearly one-third of all women murdered in the United States in recent years were murdered by a current or former intimate partner. In 2010, 1,017 women, more than three a day, were killed by their intimate partners.

  • Of females killed with a firearm, almost two-thirds of were killed by an intimate partner.
  • Access to firearms increases the risk of intimate partner homicide more than five times, compared to instances where there are no weapons, according to a recent study. In addition, abusers who possess guns tend to inflict the most severe abuse on their partners.
  • In 2010, 52 percent of female homicide victims were shot and killed with a gun.
  • Handguns are more likely than rifles or shotguns to be used in homicides in which men kill women. In 2010, handguns were used in 70 percent of cases where men used firearms to kill women.
  • In 1998, for every one woman who used a handgun to kill an intimate acquaintance in self-defense, 83 women were murdered by an intimate acquaintance using a handgun.
  • Domestic violence misdemeanor convictions and restraining orders were the second most common reason for denials of handgun purchase applications between 1994 and 1998.

 


January is National Stalking Awareness Month

Reno NV—January is National Stalking Awareness Month, a time to focus on a crime that affects 6.6 million victims in one year. The theme—“Stalking: Know It. Name It. Stop It.”—challenges the nation to fight this dangerous crime by learning more about it.

Stalking is a crime in all 50 states, the U.S. Territories and the District of Columbia, yet many victims and criminal justice professionals underestimate its seriousness and impact. In one of five cases, stalkers use weapons to harm or threaten victims, and stalking is one of the significant risk factors for femicide (homicide of women) in abusive relationships. Victims suffer anxiety, social dysfunction, and severe depression at much higher rates than the general population, and many lose time from work or have to move as a result of their victimization.

Stalking is difficult to recognize, investigate, and prosecute. Unlike other crimes, stalking is not a single, easily identifiable crime but a series of acts, a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause that person fear. Stalking may take many forms, such as assaults, threats, vandalism, burglary, or animal abuse, as well as unwanted cards, calls, gifts, or visits. One in four victims reports that the stalker uses technology, such as computers, global positioning system devices, or hidden cameras, to track the victim’s daily activities. Stalkers fit no standard psychological profile, and many stalkers follow their victims from one jurisdiction to another, making it difficult for authorities to investigate and prosecute their crimes. Communities that understand stalking, however, can support victims and combat the crime.

“If more people learn to recognize stalking,” said Sue Meuschke, Executive Director, NNADV, “we have a better chance to protect victims and prevent tragedies.”

To learn more about the crime of stalking in Nevada and U.S., recent statistics, the myths, and the history of the movement, please visit http://stalkingawarenessmonth.org and www.ovw.usdoj.gov.


Jacksons Food Stores Support NNADV

Reno, NV–On Thanksgiving Day, Jacksons Food Stores and the Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence will launch the “Give the Gift of Peace” campaign, a holiday season campaign that runs through December 25th to raise funds for the prevention of domestic violence through community awareness. AT the end of the campaign, Jacksons Chief Executive Officer John Jackson will match Jacksons Food Stores customers’ contributions dollar for dollar up to $75,000 with all the proceeds going to the Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence.

Since 2003 customers have contributed to the campaign by purchasing a paper dove for one dollar at Jacksons Food Stores. In the 2011 campaign, customers contributed over $6,000, resulting in over $13,000 in donations, including Jackson’s dollar for dollar match contribution. Nevada donations have resulted in over $28,000 throughout the entirety of the campaign.

“We ask our customers to join us in the cause toward ending and preventing violence in our communities during the ‘Give the Gift of Peace’ campaign,” said Jackson. “Together we have the power to make a difference in the lives of those affected by domestic violence.”

Jacksons Food Stores in Washington, Oregon and Idaho will also participate in the campaign, and proceeds will go toward coalitions against domestic violence in respective states. Since the inception of the “Give the Gift of Peace” campaign, over half a million dollars have been raised to help end violence against women and girls and assist individuals who have experienced domestic violence.

“John Jackson’s willingness to bring the attention of his customers to the daily struggles of the abused working toward a violence-free life is tremendously important to our efforts to help domestic violence victims,” says NNADV Executive Director Sue Meuschke, who also thanks those who gave generously last year. She notes that every dollar counts by directly assisting victims, especially those in rural areas, to acquire resources such as transportation and emergency relocation.

Tax-deductible contributions to the Nevada Network of Domestic Violence can be made online at nnadv.org.


Nevada Ranks #1 in Rate of Women Murdered by Men

Nevada Has Held Top Spot for Five of the Last Six Years

According to a study released by the Violence Policy Center today, Nevada ranked first in the nation in the rate of women killed by men for the third year in a row with a rate of 2.62 per 100,000. This rate was more than double the national average.

Snapshot of Nevada, according to the VPC study:

  • In 2010, 35 women were murdered by men in Nevada
  • For homicides in which the weapon used could be identified, 45 percent of female victims were shot and killed with guns. Of these, 73 percent were killed with handguns.
  • For homicides in which the victim to offender relationship could be identified, 91 percent of the female victims were murdered by someone they knew, 56 percent were wives, common-law wives, ex-wives, or girlfriends of the offenders.

“Reducing domestic violence homicide is the responsibility of all Nevada’s communities,” says Sue Meuschke, Executive Director of the Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence. “As this report points out, women in Nevada are at a higher risk of being victims of homicide perpetrated by people they know and love. Much more must be done in our state to change this outcome.”

The annual VPC report, When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2010 Homicide Data, details national and state-by-state information on female homicides involving one female murder victim and one male offender. The annual report uses the most recent data available (2010) from the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s unpublished Supplementary Homicide Report and is released each year to coincide with Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October. The study concludes, “The picture that emerges from When Men Murder Women is that women face the greatest threat from someone they know, most often a spouse or intimate acquaintance, who is armed with a gun. for women in America, guns are not used to save lives, but to take them.”


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